September 2012 NEWS I joined Christophe and Johannes as partner at precious design studio. You'll find my latest activity on http://precious-forever.com.

Below are projects I created between 2009 and 2012.


Bum Tschack Wippe

Installation On Art- And Music-Playground
Dockville-Festival 2009


2009. The "Bum Tschack Wippe" is a seesaw that makes sound. I designed and created the seesaw and developed a sound unit which is made for mobile use on other playgrounds and playground equipment. The seesaw itself is built out of larch wood and stands on a 6m to 8m lawn. It was installed on Dockville Festival, a 15000 visitors indie music festival in Hamburg.

The sound unit is a coaster wagon equipped with a Sensor, a PA-System and a MacBook. The sensor – an Arduino and accelerometer in an aluminium box – is attached with hook-and-loop tape on the seesaw beam. The software I've written for this project, reads the sensor data, analyses the movement of the seesaw and and provides information like position, endurance, regularity, intensity and beats per minute via OSC.

I created a second software called Influquencer, a sequencer that receives the OSC data and sends out midi signals to turn the analysed movement into music. To learn more about Influquencer, see the notes on this flickr image. I would love to release this software as soon as possible but need to remove some bugs first.

For now, watch this video to see people enjoying the Bum Tschack Wippe.

People On Bum Tschack Wippe, Dockville 2009


Me installing the sound unit for the seesaw; Attaching the sensor (Arduino + Accelerometer in an aluminium box with hook-and-loop tape); Calibrating the analysis software.

Photos On Flickr

Thank you! Vielen Dank an alle Helfer und OpenSource Projekte!

Das Dockville-Team: Doro, Felix, Jonathan, Laura, Maren; Anja; Mathias; alle Dockville-Helfer; Arvid + seine Jungs; Christophe, Johannes, Milan; Markus, Olli;

processing, controlP5, oscP5, lusidOSC, promidi, proxml, silkscreen, arduino, ...


Additional German Info

"Bum – Tschack, rauf – runter. Der Multimediatüftler Michael Schieben verwandelt eine einfache Wippbewegung in Beats. Musiker und Sounddesigner sind dazu eingeladen, daraus wiederum ihre eigenen Kompositionen zu entwickeln. Die Bum Tschack Wippe, deren Name sich aus den Bezeichnungen der Rockmusik für Bass-Drum und Snare zusammensetzt, erweitert den Dockville-Spielplatz um eine weitere Installation an der Schnittstelle von kinderleichter Nutzung und musikalischer Vision. Wie lässt sich ein analoges Spielgerät digital erweitern? Wie verändert sich das Spiel dadurch?

– Info der Veranstalter


Wie die Wippe funktioniert

— eine abstrakte Beschreibung